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Invasion USA  Former Reagan official Ed Meese says bill largely the same as path-to-citizenship offered in 1986
Bush, Congress tell working folks to go to hell
To provide for comprehensive immigration reform  How Your Senator Voted

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  Uncanny Similarities
Posted: May 24, 2006  12:58 p.m. Eastern  2006 WorldNetDaily.com

Former Attorney General Edwin Meese III served under President Reagan from 1985 to 1988, and is now a fellow with the Heritage Foundation in Washington.  He remarks on  the "uncanny similarities" to the immigration situation 20 years ago,  and says that despite President Bush's denials, the guest-worker proposal under consideration in the Senate amounts to "amnesty."

Meese, writing in an editorial published today by the New York Times, points out the bill passed by Congress in 1986 – which President Reagan called amnesty – has virtually the same provisions "cited by its supporters as proof that they have eschewed amnesty in favor of earned citizenship."  Under the 1986 legislation, most illegal immigrants who could establish they had resided in the United States continuously for five years were granted temporary resident status, which could be upgraded to permanent residency after 18 months and, after another five years, to citizenship.  "Note that this path to citizenship was not automatic," Meese points out. "Indeed, the legislation stipulated several conditions: immigrants had to pay application fees, learn to speak English, understand American civics, pass a medical exam and register for military selective service. Those with convictions for a felony or three misdemeanors were ineligible. Sound familiar?"

The 1986 bill also strengthened border security and enforcement of immigration laws, in part through sanctions against employers who hired illegal immigrants.  He explains that the 1986 legislation was pushed by the Democratic majority in the House and the Select Commission on Immigration and Refugee Policy. President Reagan, he said, "considered it reasonable to adjust the status of what was then a relatively small population, and I supported his decision."

The difference between then and now, Meese says, "is that President Reagan called this what it was: amnesty."  "Indeed, look up the term 'amnesty' in Black's Law Dictionary, and you'll find it says, 'the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act provided amnesty for undocumented aliens already in the country.'"  Meese emphasizes the 1986 act "did not solve our illegal immigration problem."

"From the start, there was widespread document fraud by applicants," he says. "Unsurprisingly, the number of people applying for amnesty far exceeded projections. And there proved to be a failure of political will in enforcing new laws against employers."  Meese says illegal immigration, after a six-month slowdown following passage of the legislation, returned to normal levels and continued unabated.  "Ultimately, some 2.7 million people were granted amnesty, and many who were not stayed anyway, forming the nucleus of today's unauthorized population," he said.

"So here we are, 20 years later, having much the same debate and being offered much the same deal in exchange for promises largely dependent on the will of future Congresses and presidents."  Meese says President Bush and Congress must start with securing the border and strengthening enforcement of existing immigration laws.  Those who are here illegally, he says, must return to their country of origin and get "in line with everyone else."

He concludes: "America welcomes more immigrants than any other country. But in keeping open that door of opportunity, we also must uphold the rule of law and enhance a fair immigration process, as Ronald Reagan said, to 'humanely regain control of our borders and thereby preserve the value of one of the most sacred possessions of our people: American citizenship.'"

Read Michelle Malkin's "Invasion"

 Bush, Congress tell working folk to go to hell

By Lou Dobbs  CNN   Editor's note: Lou Dobbs' commentary appears every Wednesday on CNN.com.

NEW YORK (CNN) -- Sen. Harry Reid (D) declares that legislation that would render English the national language is racist.

Thirty-seven Democrats vote for full amnesty for all illegal aliens in this country, even though nobody really knows whether the number is 11 million, 12 million or 20 million. The Senate Republican leadership demands that a "comprehensive immigration reform" plan must be passed before this Memorial Day weekend.

Never before in our country's history have both the president and Congress been so out of touch with most Americans. Never before have so few of our elected officials and corporate leaders been less willing to commit to the national interest. And never before has our nation's largest constituent group -- some 200 million middle-class Americans -- been without representation in our nation's capital.

George W. Bush's approval ratings have slumped to the lowest of his presidency. The approval rating for Congress is even lower, and nearly three-quarters of Americans believe the country is headed in the wrong direction.  But what is our government doing about that?  [Bush and the Senate] also wants a guest-worker program and amnesty of millions of illegal aliens. And Congress, faced with midterm elections in just over five months, is intent on giving the president what he wants and telling working men and women and their families, American citizens all, to go to hell.

Illegal aliens are more important to this Congress than securing our borders and our ports, more important than those legal immigrants who have waited in line and who follow the law. The Senate has added to the litany of lunacy that makes up what it calls reform: Illegal aliens would only have to pay back taxes on three of the past five years, they will not be prosecuted for felonies such as identity theft or purchasing or using fraudulent Social Security cards, and unlike millions of visa holders who have to leave the country to have them renewed, they may remain in the United States while this Congress and this president give away all the benefits and privileges of American citizenship.

This is an outright assault on the middle class. And working men and women who've already borne the pain of losing good-paying manufacturing jobs and having middle-class jobs outsourced to cheap foreign labor markets are faced with the onslaught of more illegal immigration and cheap labor into the American economy. This president and Congress talk about bringing illegal aliens out of the shadows while they turn out the lights on our middle class.

President Bush and his most trusted advisers tell us how well our economy is doing, how many jobs have been created and how so-called free trade will enrich the lives of the same people whose livelihoods these policies are destroying.

It's hard not to think of the trusted adviser to Catherine the Great who sought to hide from her the embarrassing and shoddy condition of Ukrainian and Crimean villages by having elaborate facades built to divert her attention and to mask an uncomfortable reality. I don't know whether Karl Rove is President Bush's Grigori Potemkin or whether George Bush has created Potemkin villages all by himself. But the facades are cracking, and phony fronts of failed policies are quickly crumbling.

Six thousand unarmed National Guardsmen working as adjunct rear support to our undermanned, under-equipped Border Patrol is not border security. Three million illegal aliens continue to cross our borders and depress wages by hundreds of billions of dollars every year. The millions of manufacturing and middle-class jobs lost over the last five years have been replaced by lower-wage employment.

The president's faith-based commitment to so-called free trade will likely lead to a $1 trillion U.S. current account deficit this year and a trade debt of $4.5 trillion after 30 years of trade deficits.

A third-world country is what we will be if our elected officials don't soon come to their senses.
 

 U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 109th Congress - 2nd Session  as compiled through Senate LIS by the Senate Bill Clerk under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate

Vote Summary

Question: On Passage of the Bill (S. 2611 As Amended )
Vote Number: 157
Vote Date: May 25, 2006, 05:39 PM
Required For Majority: 1/2
Vote Result: Bill Passed
Measure Number: S. 2611 (Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2006 )
Measure Title: A bill to provide for comprehensive immigration reform and for other purposes.
Vote Counts:  YEAs 62  -  NAYs 36  -  Not Voting 2

A Congressman has three conditions to meet to receive the vote of the Conservative block.  They must keep taxes low.  They must keep spending under control.  They must maintain the sovereignty and Security of America, and assure the safety of all citizens against foreign and domestic destruction.  Look over this Senate vote.  A “Yea” vote allows millions of illegal aliens to stay in this country and become citizens.  The moment they become citizens they are authorized to bring in their parents, wives, and all other kids they have from where ever they are.

Grouped By Vote Position

YEAs - 62
Akaka (D-HI)
Baucus (D-MT)
Bayh (D-IN)
Bennett (R-UT)
Biden (D-DE)
Bingaman (D-NM)
Boxer (D-CA)
Brownback (R-KS)
Cantwell (D-WA)
Carper (D-DE)
Chafee (R-RI)
Clinton (D-NY)
Coleman (R-MN)
Collins (R-ME)
Conrad (D-ND)
Craig (R-ID)
Dayton (D-MN)
DeWine (R-OH)
Dodd (D-CT)
Domenici (R-NM)
Durbin (D-IL)
 
Feingold (D-WI)
Feinstein (D-CA)
Frist (R-TN)
Graham (R-SC)
Gregg (R-NH)
Hagel (R-NE)
Harkin (D-IA)
Inouye (D-HI)
Jeffords (I-VT)
Johnson (D-SD)
Kennedy (D-MA)
Kerry (D-MA)
Kohl (D-WI)
Landrieu (D-LA)
Lautenberg (D-NJ)
Leahy (D-VT)
Levin (D-MI)
Lieberman (D-CT)
Lincoln (D-AR)
Lugar (R-IN)
Martinez (R-FL)
 
McCain (R-AZ)
McConnell (R-KY)
Menendez (D-NJ)
Mikulski (D-MD)
Murkowski (R-AK)
Murray (D-WA)
Nelson (D-FL)
Obama (D-IL)
Pryor (D-AR)
Reed (D-RI)
Reid (D-NV)
Sarbanes (D-MD)
Schumer (D-NY)
Smith (R-OR)
Snowe (R-ME)
Specter (R-PA)
Stevens (R-AK)
Voinovich (R-OH)
Warner (R-VA)
Wyden (D-OR)
 
NAYs - 36
Alexander (R-TN)
Allard (R-CO)
Allen (R-VA)
Bond (R-MO)
Bunning (R-KY)
Burns (R-MT)
Burr (R-NC)
Byrd (D-WV)
Chambliss (R-GA)
Coburn (R-OK)
Cochran (R-MS)
Cornyn (R-TX)
 
Crapo (R-ID)
DeMint (R-SC)
Dole (R-NC)
Dorgan (D-ND)
Ensign (R-NV)
Enzi (R-WY)
Grassley (R-IA)
Hatch (R-UT)
Hutchison (R-TX)
Inhofe (R-OK)
Isakson (R-GA)
Kyl (R-AZ)
 
Lott (R-MS)
Nelson (D-NE)
Roberts (R-KS)
Santorum (R-PA)
Sessions (R-AL)
Shelby (R-AL)
Stabenow (D-MI)
Sununu (R-NH)
Talent (R-MO)
Thomas (R-WY)
Thune (R-SD)
Vitter (R-LA)
 
 

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